Heisenberg part 2: Leibniz, Camus, and Kuhn (oh my!)

Continuing my commentary on Heisenberg’s Physics and Philosophy (see my previous post for more), I have a few more scattered thoughts to get down. In no particular order:

Heisenberg, Spekkens & Leibniz

In a recent talk, Rob Spekkens argues that a principle articulated by Leibniz, often called the identity of indiscernibles, provides justification for a number of desidirata (e.g. locality and noncontextuality) that have emerged over the past hundred years for interpretations of quantum mechanics. The principle can be stated as follows:

To suppose two things indiscernible is to suppose the same thing under two names.

This has been interpreted in many ways by many different people, but Spekkens rephrases it as Continue reading “Heisenberg part 2: Leibniz, Camus, and Kuhn (oh my!)”